Friday, September 25, 2009

Post-1054 Common Saints

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These are some post-1054 saints that are found on both Orthodox and Catholic calendars of saints. Happy feast day of the great St. Sergius of Radonezh! Update 2/9/2010: there are some that I deleted, but I will restore them if I can confirm that they are actually on calendars of saints of any of the sui iuris Churches.

Note:




Update 11/8/2010: Thank you Brandon Watson and David Mills for linking to this post. Dear reader, please also check out my 11/2/2010 post "Post-Schism Russian Orthodox Saints (Fr. Joseph Schweigl)". Thank you and God bless you and yours. Pray for me, a sinner!

*St. Abraham of Rostov (Abercius: archimandrite) [†10/29/1073]
Source: Ukrainian Greek Catholic Menaion for October 29, Melkite Greek Catholic Menaion for October 29, Ruthenian Catholic Calendar for October 29.
*St. Abraham of Smolensk (archimandrite) [1150-8/21/1224]
Note: St. Abraham of Smolensk is one of the 21 Russian Orthodox saints that Ven. Pope Pius XII of Rome authorized for veneration by Russian Catholics in a 1940 decree, according to Butler's Lives of the Saints, Thurston & Attwater Edition, Vol. III (July-Sept) 639-640.
*St. Anthony of the Kiev Far Caves (Antipas: monk founder of Russian monasticism) [983-5/7/1073]
Source: Roman Martyrology for May 7, Ukrainian Greek Catholic Menaion for July 10, Ruthenian Catholic Calendar for July 10.
*St. Anthony of Vilnius (martyr) [†4/14/1347]
Source: Ukrainian Greek Catholic Menaion for April 14, Ruthenian Catholic Calendar for April 14.
*St. Barlaam of Khutyn, Novgorod (abbot) [†11/6/1193]
Note: St. Barlaam of Khutyn, whom the Russian Catholics invoke in the prothesis of the Divine Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom, is one of the 21 Russian Orthodox saints that Ven. Pope Pius XII of Rome authorized for veneration by Russian Catholics in a 1940 decree, according to Fr. Yves Congar, O.P., "A propos des saints canonisés dans les Eglises orthodoxes," Revue des sciences religieuses, 22 (1948), 254.
*St. Cyril of Turov (bishop) [1130-4/28/1182]
Source: Melkite Greek Catholic Menaion for April 28, Ukrainian Greek Catholic Menaion for April 28, Ruthenian Catholic Calendar for April 28.
*St. Euphrosyne of Polotsk (princess & virgin nun) [†5/23/1173]
Sources: Ukrainian Greek Catholic Menaion for May 23, Ruthenian Catholic Calendar for May 23.
*St. Eustace of Vilnius (martyr) [†4/14/1347]
Source: Ukrainian Greek Catholic Menaion for April 14, Ruthenian Catholic Calendar for April 14.
*St. Gregory Palamas the Wonderworker of Thessalonica (Hesychast archbishop & abbot) [1296-11/14/1359]
Sources: Melkite Greek Catholic Menaion for Second Sunday of Great Lent, Ukrainian Greek Catholic Menaion for Second Sunday of Great Lent.
*St. Isaiah the Wonderworker of Rostov (bishop) [†5/15/1090]
Source: Melkite Greek Catholic Menaion for May 15, Ruthenian Catholic Calendar for May 15.
*St. John of Vilnius (martyr) [†4/14/1347]
Source: Ukrainian Greek Catholic Menaion for April 14, Ruthenian Catholic Calendar for April 14.
*St. Leontius the Wonderworker of Murom (Bishop of Rostov) [†5/23/1073]
Note: St. Leontius of Rostov, whom the Russian Catholics invoke in the prothesis of the Divine Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom, is one of the 21 Russian Orthodox saints that Ven. Pope Pius XII of Rome authorized for veneration by Russian Catholics in a 1940 decree, according to Butler's Lives of the Saints, Thurston & Attwater Edition, Vol. III (July-Sept) 639-640.
*St. Michael the Wonderworker of Chernigov (Grand Prince of Kiev & martyr) [†1246]
Source: Ruthenian Catholic Calendar for September 20.
*St. Nicetas of the Kiev Far Caves (Bishop of Novgorod) [†1/31/1109]
Source:
Note: St. Nicetas of Novgorod, whom the Russian Catholics invoke in the prothesis of the Divine Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom, is one of the 21 Russian Orthodox saints that Ven. Pope Pius XII of Rome authorized for veneration by Russian Catholics in a 1940 decree, according to Fr. Yves Congar of pious memory, "A propos des saints canonisés dans les Eglises orthodoxes," Revue des sciences religieuses, 22 (1948), 254.
*St. Nicetas the Stylite, Wonderworker of Pereyaslavl & Zalesski () [†5/24/1186]
Source: Ukrainian Greek Catholic Menaion for May 24, Ruthenian Catholic Calendar for May 24.
*St. Parasceva Petka the New, Wonderworker of Serbia () [†10/14/1201]
Source: Ukrainian Greek Catholic Menaion for October 14, Ruthenian Catholic Calendar for October 14.
*St. Sergius the Wonderworker of Radonezh (Bartholomew: abbot) [5/3/1314-9/25/1392]
Source: Roman Martyrology for September 25.
Note: St. Sergius of Radonezh, whom the Russian Catholics invoke in the prothesis of the Divine Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom, is one of the 21 Russian Orthodox saints that Ven. Pope Pius XII of Rome authorized for veneration by Russian Catholics in a 1940 decree, according to Butler's Lives of the Saints, Thurston & Attwater Edition, Vol. III (July-Sept) 639-640. I have not tracked down this decree. For more info, see my post "Ven. Pope Pius XII and St. Sergius of Radonezh."
*St. Stephen of the Kiev Far Caves (abbot of Pechersk & bishop of Vladimir in Volhynia) [†4/27/1094]
Source: Melkite Greek Catholic Menaion for April 27, Ukrainian Greek Catholic Menaion for April 27, Ruthenian Catholic Calendar for April 27.
*St. Stephen the Enlightener of Perm (bishop & Apostle to the Zyrians) [1340-4/26/1395]
Source: Roman Martyrology for April 26.
*St. Theodore the Wonderworker of Chernigov (counselor & martyr) [†1246]
Source: Ruthenian Catholic Calendar for September 20.

*St. Theodosius of the Kiev Far Caves (abbot & Father of cenobitic monasticism in Russia) [†5/3/1074]
Source: Roman Martyrology for May 3, Ruthenian Catholic Calendar for May 3
Note: St. Theodosius Pechersky, whom the Russian Catholics invoke in the prothesis of the Divine Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom, is one of the 21 Russian Orthodox saints that Ven. Pope Pius XII of Rome authorized for veneration by Russian Catholics in a 1940 decree, according to Butler's Lives of the Saints, Thurston & Attwater Edition, Vol. III (July-Sept) 639-640.

4 comments:

papsttreu said...

Is this to suggest that those who follow him who creates schism can then be saved?

"If any man follows him that makes a schism in the Church, he shall not inherit the Kingdom of God." - St. Ignatius of Antioch (Epistle to the Philadelphians 3 in PG 5:700A )

I apologize for my lack of knowledge, but wasn't schism considered to be a very grave sin? Some of these Eastern Orthodox Saints have been anti-Catholic until the end.

Will R. Huysman said...

Dear brother in Christ,
Thank you for your readership and feedback. I wouldn't want to suggest that, but remain perplexed by the fact that Holy Mother Church tolerates the veneration of certain schismatics like Gregory Palamas and apparently Nicodemus of Mt. Athos (who denied the validity of Latin baptism) if the Catholic Online page is reliable. I have tried my best the past couple of years to offer explanations and obtain solid answers from Eastern Catholics, without any real success.

God bless you and yours,
Will R. Huysman

papsttreu said...

Dear brother in Christ,

I thank you for your honest response. I have to say that I am quite surprised by such findings. On the one hand we have the strict belief in the visible unity of the Church, and on the other hand anti-Catholic schismatics are put up for veneration.

I am moreso dumbfounded when I contrast such findings with the words of former Popes:

Pope Leo XIII, Satis Cognitum June 29, 1896: “It happens that, as in the human body, some member may be cut off – a hand, a finger, a foot. Does the soul follow the amputated member? As long as it was in the body, it lived; separated, it forfeits life. So the Christian is a Catholic as long as he lives in the body:... cut off from it he becomes a heretic – the life of the Spirit follows not the amputated member.”

Thank you very much for the response though. And keep up the excellent work!

peace

Will R. Huysman said...

Dear papsttreu,

The saints in the post were all on *official* Catholic calendars (Roman Martyrology; Ruthenian, Melkite Greek Catholic, and Ukrainian Greek Catholic) or Liturgies (Russian Catholic Divine Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom), or mentioned as ecclesiastically approved in reliable print sources. I removed the rabidly anti-Catholic Nicodemus the Hagiorite, who denied the validity of our baptism, since he is not in any of these sources and was glorified by the Ecumenical Patriarchate only in 1955, well after the reunion of separated Eastern churches with the Catholic Church.

God bless you & yours,
Will Raphael Huysman