Friday, October 10, 2008

Capita Physica Theologica Epitomes 126-150

Part VI of VI. Here I attempt to provide the epitomes of each chapter of the 150-chapter Capita Physica Theologica, a work of systematic theology by Archbishop St. Gregory Palamas the Wonderworker of Thessaloniki, who is venerated by Catholics and Eastern Orthodox alike. I pretty-much omit the very often powerful, straight-forward reasoning process of the saint, which can be reminiscent of that of the prince of theologians, that Angelic Doctor St. Thomas Aquinas. Nevertheless I give the conclusions of the miracle-working archbishop and try to do justice to his holy memory by portraying these conclusions completely and accurately.

126.
127.
128. St. Gregory the Theologian [Or. 31:6, PG 36:140A] is right to teach that the Divine Energy does not involve composition, because only the Divine Energy has no passion and He only acts by it and is not acted upon, so there is no coming into being or change involved.
129.
130.
131.
132.
133.
134.
135.
136.
137.
138. The energy of the three divine hypostases is numerically one but since the Akindynists cannot affirm these they take away the actual subsistence of the trihypostatic God.
139. Against Akindynos: One cannot create and be active without an energy, just as one cannot exist without existence, so to call God's energy is to created is to deny that He has the power to operate and create in an uncreated way.
140. Against Akindynos: God is eternally active and all-powerful and His energy is uncreated and coeternal with Him but the products and effects of the divine energy are creatures.
141.
142.
143. The saintly Doctors Basil the Great [Adversus Eunomium 4, PG 29:689C], Cyril of Alexandria [Thesaurus 18, PG 75:312C], and John Damascene [Expositio fidei 8:67-70; 59:6-9] teach that the Divine Energy is in many ways distinct from the Divine Substance.
144.
145. The real distinction between the Divine Essence and the Divine Energies does not introduce composition into God because God acts ad extra without being acted upon and undergoing change.
146.
147.
148.
149.
150.

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